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This quick and simple vegan teriyaki chickpeas paired with crispy roasted brussels sprouts put a delightful spin on a classic Asian meal. It’s also served with stir-fried garlicky mushrooms and broccoli plus rice noodles.

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Teriyaki is the front-runner for deliciously-quick and flavourful, Asian-style dinners. I first tried it when I lived in Japan and I got hooked! I had teriyaki at least once a week. Tofu teriyaki is more popularly known (check out the recipe post here), but once I was out of tofu and figured I should give chickpeas a try. Man it was just as good! Chickpeas are also packed with protein and filling so they make the perfect alternative. Plus they are soy-free.

If you’re unfamiliar, Teriyaki is a Japanese method of cooking where meat is marinated then broiled or grilled. However, teriyaki popularly makes reference to the cooking sauce typically used in stir-fries.

The most surprising thing I’ve discovered was that teriyaki sauce was not as popular in Japan as it is in the West. I couldn’t find more than 2 brands in the major supermarkets and smaller supermarkets didn’t sell it at all. 

The brand of teriyaki sauce I used most often was this one from Kikkoman. It has a mild smoky flavour without being overly sweet, which made it uniquely different from the other brands I’ve tried. Plus the ingredients are vegan-friendly.

 vegan teriyaki sauce kikkoman

The translated ingredients are as follows: Soy sauce (soybeans, wheat), glucose, sugar, apple, sweet sake, onion, ginger, garlic, starch, yeast extract, vinegar, salt.

The only downfall with this sauce was that it was so hard to find! And believe me, I’ve hunted for that particular sauce numerous times. Sure, I could have tried making a homemade version but lazy-cooking convenience was what I was after. However, if you’d like to try making your own, here’s a simple recipe by Healthy Nibbles and Bits.

But I’m still obsessed with the store-bought stuff to the point where I’ve managed to find and order it straight from Japan! (Ok, maybe a little too obsessed) My search lead me to this seller on eBay who lives in Japan and sells all kinds of nostalgic Japanese products. Shipping takes about 2 weeks so I ordered 4 bottles of the stuff. They arrived without problems.

I couldn’t find this exact teriyaki sauce on Amazon. Kikkoman does have another type that’s easily found in the West but I’m honestly not a fan of it. It’s much more watery in texture (think soy sauce) and the flavours are not as strong. The closest alternative I’ve found based on ingredients and with good reviews is Soy Vay Teriyaki Marinade & Sauce. If you’re looking for a soy and gluten-free teriyaki sauce Oceans Halo makes one.

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts are rather easy to identify as they look like tiny cabbages and are similar in taste. They tend to get a bad wrap amongst many and I can understand why. I’ve tried brussels sprouts, both big and small, and I’ve found that the smaller, younger types taste much sweeter and more are tender than the larger, older ones.

So if you’re always choosing the latter, you may be thinking that all brussels sprouts are bad! When in fact they are quite tasty especially when roasted until crispy.

To prep brussels sprouts for roasting, rinse and drain carefully to remove any dirt then cut off the stems. Next, slice them in half and you’re ready to go!

Check out these other quick dinner ideas:

Teriyaki Chickpeas with Crispy Brussels Sprouts
Teriyaki Chickpeas with crispy brussel sprouts
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Easy Teriyaki Chickpeas with Super Crispy Brussels Sprouts

This quick, simple vegan teriyaki chickpeas paired with crispy roasted brussels sprouts put a delightful spin on a classic Asian meal. It’s also served up with stir-fried garlicky mushrooms and broccoli and rice noodles.
Total Time30 mins
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: Asian
Keyword: brussels sprouts, chickpeas, easy recipe, high protein, mushroom, quick
Servings: 3

Equipment

  • Baking tray

Ingredients

Teriyaki Chickpeas

  • 1 can Chickpeas, (see notes)
  • 1/2 cup Teriyaki sauce, (118ml)
  • 1 small Red bell pepper, chopped
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

  • 3 cups Brussels sprouts, (264g)
  • 1 tbsp Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Mushroom-Broccoli Stir-fry

  • 9 small Mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 small Head of Broccoli, chopped into smaller pieces
  • 1 tbsp Oil
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 tbsps Soy sauce
  • Black pepper, to taste

Instructions

  • Rinse brussels sprouts under cool water to remove dirt and cut off stems if needed. Drain completely and dry on a lint lint-free kitchen towel.
  • Cut brussels sprouts in half and place on baking tray. Coat pieces evenly with olive oil and season with salt and black pepper. Lay pieces cut side down and roast in oven at 180°C/356°F for 15 to 20 mins, until brown and crispy. Turn over the pieces halfway through cooking time.
  • In the meantime, heat remaining oil in a pan and add chopped broccoli and mushrooms. Cook until broccoli starts to brown then season with soy sauce, garlic and black pepper. Remove from pan.
  • Next, add the teriyaki sauce to the pan on low heat. Drain chickpeas, add to the sauce and simmer for 5 mins. Stir in the red bell pepper and remove from heat.
  • Serve chickpeas, sprouts and stir-fry with rice or noodles.

Notes

  • 1 standard can of chickpeas (400g) is about 1 1/2 cups (250g) cooked chickpeas after draining.
  • I used shitake mushrooms for this recipe but, cremini (brown or white) and oyster mushrooms work fine as well.
  • For an even quicker meal, stir-fry the broccoli and mushrooms with garlic then add the chickpeas, red peppers, teriyaki sauce and black pepper. No need to add soy sauce and only add salt if needed.
Tried this recipe? Snap a pic!Mention @fromthecomfortofmybowl or tag #fromthecomfortofmybowl!

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